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Volleyball Championship بطولة

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Volleyball players, coaches, and their families are packing the Kentucky Exposition Center this weekend for the JVA World Challenge Volleyball Tournament—the largest event to be held at the venue in more than a year. “This is probably the largest number of people who have joined since then,” venue spokesperson Ian Cox said. “It’s been over 15 months now, so it’s great to see and we’re very lucky to have them.” “This represents something we have all hoped for like the light at the end of the tunnel.” The start day of the tournament on Friday coincided with the lifting of all COVID-19 restrictions statewide which was welcome news for loved ones of the players. who attended the tournament. Beverly MacDonald said, “We were only able to have two people per kid so we could have as many members of our family in this tournament. This is the first time we’ve been able to do that.. I wasn’t sure if we needed our mask, So I brought a mask anyway, but I went in and just saw all these faces and smiles and human connection.” The big event wasn’t just welcome news for the center but the surrounding area is – she. “We serve our local business,” Cox said. “Our hotels, our restaurants, our bars. The area benefits from having events like this.” JVA Marketing Director Briana Shunzel expects the tournament to draw more than 25,000 people and part of it is the lure of the city itself. “This is really important as part of these events,” Schonzel said. “To not only be able to play volleyball, but to be able to enjoy your time off the field as well.” Cox said the event was expected to have an economic impact on an area of ​​more than $11 million—something the city has not seen. over a year. “We are thrilled to be part of the change of pace, and excited to be involved in driving the economic impact,” Cox said. “We have the space and services to really match any event with the perfect Commonwealth experience, so it’s just an honor, and if that doesn’t give you goosebumps, I don’t know what will.” The venue has 10 events planned for the month of June. Shunzel said that having a unique city is always vital to hosting big events. “It’s really important to come to a city that welcomes you and takes good care of you and Louisville will,” Schonzel said.

Volleyball players, coaches, and their families are packing the Kentucky Exposition Center this weekend for the JVA World Challenge Volleyball Tournament—the largest event to be held at the venue in more than a year.

“This is probably the largest number of people who have joined since then,” venue spokesperson Ian Cox said. “It’s been over 15 months now, so it’s great to see and we’re very lucky to have them.” “This represents something we’ve all hoped for like the light at the end of the tunnel.”

The start day of the tournament Friday coincided with the lifting of all COVID-19 restrictions statewide which was welcome news for loved ones of the players who attended the tournament.

“We were only able to have two people per kid, so we can have as many people in our family as possible in this tournament,” said Beverly MacDonald.

“This is the first time we’ve been able to do this. I wasn’t sure if we needed our mask, so I brought a mask anyway, but I went in and just saw all these faces and smiles and human contact.”

The big event was not just welcome news for the center but the area around it.

“We serve our local business,” Cox said. “Our hotels, restaurants and bars. The area benefits from having events like this.”

Briana Shunzel, director of marketing for JVA, expects the tournament to attract more than 25,000 people and part of it is the lure of the city itself.

“This is really important as part of these events,” Schonzel said. “To be able not only to play volleyball but also to be able to enjoy your time off the field.”

Cox said the event was expected to have an economic impact on an area of ​​more than $11 million — something the city hasn’t seen in more than a year.

“We are thrilled to be part of the change of pace, and excited to be involved in driving the economic impact,” Cox said. “We have the space and services to really match any event with the perfect Commonwealth experience, so it’s just an honor, and if that doesn’t give you goosebumps, I don’t know what will.”

The venue has 10 events planned for the month of June. Shunzel said that having a unique city is always vital to hosting big events.

“It’s really important to come to a city that welcomes you and takes good care of you and Louisville will,” Schonzel said.

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